3 Lessons from 30 Years ~ Nimrita

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So recently, I turned 30. To be honest, I am quite excited. Jumping straight in, here are my three lessons from my 30 years

Just Get on With It

If you want to start a business, just start, get an MVP (minimum viable product). If you want to exercise, just start. There will never be the right moment or the right atmosphere. So, don’t wait for it. Just, commit to doing a little bit every day. I see so many people spending more time than needed in the planning phase (I am guilty of it myself). The most important lessons often transpire through execution. 

The man who moves a mountain begins by carrying small stones.

Confucius 

Don’t be a Passive Spectator

 If you care about a cause, or worry about the migrant crisis or care about Hong Kong. Help the cause however possible. This doesn’t imply getting out your cheque book, it could be something as little as signing a petition. Don’t just sit there and passively watch, quietly talking to your peers about the direness of the situation. Do something, if we all take small steps, the world will be a much better place. You don’t have to be the next Greta Thunberg, take small steps to reduce your carbon footprint.

Often injustice lies in what you aren’t doing, not only in what you are doing.

Marcus Aurelius

It’s All Relative

Typically, when someone gives you advice or suggests something, it is highly subjective to their life experiences. So take it with a pinch of salt. Like my father says in jest, “Listen to everyone, ignore immediately.” Especially, in the case of Donald Trump. 

Do what feels right. Rely on evidence to make decisions. Besides, I believe learning firsthand, will serve you better in the long run. As humans, we all suffer from a degree of bias, so advice can be typically loaded with bias. 

Because, I am a bit of a rebel, I extended my list beyond three to include other life lessons. Here are some other things I picked up along the way:

  • If you don’t communicate it clearly, don’t expect others to know how you feel or what you want. 
  •  Sometimes, pondering on what’s the worst that can happen can be incredibly beneficial. Everything lies on the other side of fear and all.
  • Give people the benefit of the doubt, unless proven otherwise.
  • There is enough in the world for everyone, don’t be selfish.
  • As a general rule, don’t expect employees to care about your company as much as you do unless they have an incentive(not necessarily monetary) to do so.
  • Don’t do anything by halves. Be extra (adapted from Matilda)
  • You will learn something from everyone, keep an open mind.

I hope you enjoyed this article on lessons from 30 years. If you too want to be published on The Post, email nimrita@thepostindia.co.in